Study Tips

Study Tips for Dyslexic Students


If you are dyslexic, it does not need to be a barrier to education. After all, it doesn’t stop you from learning, you simply have a different way of learning.

Of course, you can deploy independent strategies to help you learn. But it is also important to communicate with your educators about what you need. 

Here are some simple study tips for you to use independently and to share with your teachers.

Take your time

Don’t rush to answer a question. If needed, ask your teacher for some extra time. At first you may not understand a question or text but don’t worry, you won’t be alone. Many students who don’t have dyslexia will be in the same position.

You specifically need time to read and re-read the text in front of you.

When you read it for the first time, underline any words that you are struggling to understand. Spend time annotating the text with what those words may mean.

Now you will be ready to read for the second time. This time, try and use your notes to understand the text.

Finally, try reading one or two more times. Use these readings to remember what you have read and its meaning.

You also need to give yourself enough time to write your answer. As with everyone else, you may need to re-write certain parts but, it may take you slightly longer.

Convert text to pictures

You won’t be the only one who understands visuals more than text. We all do.

When studying, revising or say, planning an essay, use visual tools like mind maps.  Fill your mind map with images, not text.  Make it colourful and playful. All of these things will help you understand and remember.

If you are struggling to follow the slideshow being presented in lessons, ask your teachers for a printed copy. That way, while the teacher is talking, you can follow the content at your own pace and even make notes wherever needed.

Stay organised

You may be in the position of needing to track various study materials and assignment deadlines. To help you do this, make sure that you stay organised. Do whatever works for you, but here are some ideas:

  • Study timetable
  • Calendar on the wall
  • Calendar or diary on your phone (apps like TeamUp are great)

When planning, make sure that you also factor in study time.  That way, you will be able to see exactly what you need to do (and when you need to do it), to meet your deadlines.

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Sumantha is an education and training specialist with over ten years' experience in developing and delivering adult and secondary level education. Her professional journey includes a six-year stint as a secondary school teacher. She is currently a freelance content writer and learning and development consultant. Sumantha also has a portfolio of private students who she teaches up to GCSE level.

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