Twitter

Twitter Accounts to Learn From


Social media can be a powerful tool for good in education. As Maria Khan said, “Power is gained by sharing knowledge, not hoarding it”. So, if you’re looking for a daily fix of learning, in any subject, from History or Psychology, here are my top 5 must-follow Twitter accounts…

  1. Psychology and Human Development

Dr Tim O’Brien @Doctob

If you’re intrigued by anecdotes and insights into human behaviour, and want to understand why we act and think as we do, Dr Tim O’Brien is your man. Tim is Visiting Senior Fellow, Psychology & Human Development, UCL @IOE_London. Tim focuses on wellbeing and explores aspects of human nature, encouraging empathy, kindness and understanding.

  1. Mathematics

Primary Maths @MathsPrimary

Unearth your inner maths geek by following the Head of Maths at Berkhamsted Primary School. If you’d love to master maths (who wouldn’t?) you’ll discover an array of helpful tips, as well as some real-life classroom examples and fascinating facts (and no, it’s not just algebra). The best bits? Those myth-busting, ‘ahh’-inducing posts.

  1. Science

Neil deGrasse Tyson @neiltyson

Dr. Tyson is an inspirational astrophysicist and author, with 13.5 million followers. Follow him for his knowledge and appreciation of science. You will receive so many awe-inspiring nuggets of information about our beautiful planet and way beyond. In fact, you’ll never look at the world in quite the same way again.

  1. Languages

@Languagebandit

If you’re learning a new lingo, are already beautifully bilingual or if your love for language burns brightly, then this is the account for you. Get a daily dose of the interesting facts behind where the words you’re learning come from and what they really mean. You’ll be able to surprise your friends with random facts they never knew, fuelling a whole new passion for language.

  1. History

@DigiVictorian

Dr Bob Nicolson is a Historian of Victorian Pop Culture and Reader in History & Digital Humanities at Edgehill University. Follow him for amusing and insightful snippets into the Victorians and their era; you’ll find cuttings from Answers magazines and  poetry clippings. All served up with a good measure of humour.

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